shorts

DIY Leather Cat Ears Headband

One of the most popular costumes during Halloween is the cat costume. There are varieties of cat costumes being sold in stores, but for the thrifty the best thing to do is to make their own. I will not be sharing how to make the head-to-toe attire, but I’ll be showing how to make your own subtle cat ears headband. It’s pretty easy, and it took me around 30 minutes to make this.

WHAT YOU’LL NEED:

leather/leatherette fabric

sewing machine, if available

scissors

thread

pins

tape measure

studs, if desired

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The first step is to measure your head’s circumference by simply wrapping the tape measure around your head. Mine is 28 inches, and I added an inch on both ends for the buttons (28 in + 2 in = 30 in). Lay the cloth flat and measure 30 in (length) and 4 in (width). Then cut, like so.

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Next, flip the fabric so that the left/inner side is facing you, fold in two, then stitch the edges together. If you don’t have a sewing machine, you can always sew by hand. Your fabric will look slightly cylindrical afterwards, so to flatten it, turn it over and stitch the opposite edge, like the photo above.

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When your headband’s all flat, find the middle. Depends on how narrow or wide your cat ears would want to look, find point A by measuring 2 to 3 inches from the middle section. Subsequently, find point B and C by measuring 5 to 6 inches from A. By this time you should have a perfect triangle. The next thing to do is to place C’s tail below B’s, then pull gently to create a knot.

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Your knot should like a triangle knot (#5), if not try readjusting it. After that, proceed to making the opposite ear by doing the same steps earlier. After doing so, you’ll see that your headband is starting to look like a kitten’s ears.

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If you want to include some accessories, that’s okay. Actually I’d recommend it so your headband will look more interesting. In my case, I placed gold studs on the ears for some contrast. Lastly, fasten your headband with a snap button by handsewing it at the end.

1392036_10202091118508521_1323802300_nAaaand that’s how it’s done. Here’s how it should look like when worn. One good thing about this is you can also wear it in school or any ordinary day. I teased about the tutorial weeks ago on Instagram. My IG followers always get the first dibs so follow if you like! I hope you enjoyed this tutorial! 😀

DIY Circle Skirt (Skater Skirt)

I haven’t told you this yet, but it has always been my dream to make clothes. I used to watch my mom make our school uniforms and I remember being so amazed every time. I never got it out of my system. So, a month ago I gave in and decided to take basic sewing classes. I learned how to make patterns and sew a blouse, dress, and skirt.

My first project was actually a sweetheart top but it looked terrible so I switched to a much simpler one–a skater skirt.

Skater skirts, also known as circle skirts, have been quite a hit in the country, although they’ve been around for a long time. Fashion trends, after all, just repeat themselves. They’re called circle skirts because you’ll only need a big circular cloth to make a full skirt. You’ll see an example below.

First, to make the skirt, you’ll need:

a sewing machine

1 1/2 yard of cloth

thread

measuring tape

chalk/colored pencil

pair of scissors

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Next, measure your waist in inches. Divide it by 2(pi) or 6.28 (2 x 3.14) to get the radius. My waistline is 28 in, divided by 6.28 yields 4.45 in.

Fold your cloth in fours so you don’t have to draw a full circle. Then, draw the inner edge (waistline) of your quarter circle on the cloth using your radius measurement.

Quick tip: To draw the waist radius, pin your measuring tape on the corner of the cloth, and move the tape around the cloth with a chalk/pencil at the other end to mark the waist radius.

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Decide on your skirt’s length, then add the radius plus 1/2 inch for the hemline for easier measurement later. I wanted a skirt with a 16 in length, so from the corner of the folded cloth I measured 21 in (16 in + 4.5 + .5).

Next, mark out the skirt length using the measurement.

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Afterwards,  measure the waistband. The waistband length (WL) and width (WW) depends on you. Usually the WL is just the waistline + seam allowance on right and left ends, and the WW is 1 or 2 in + 0.5 in seam allowance on top and bottom of the waistband.

In my case, my WL is 32 in [28 in + 2 (2) in] and WW is 2 in [1 in + 0.5 (2)in]. You can do the waistband before or after you’ve cut your circle skirt, whichever is more convenient for you. To save time and fabric though I decided to mark out the waistband while the fabric is still folded.

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And finally, CUTTING! Cut the fabric carefully by following the markings. Here’s what a quarter circle looks like:

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And here’s how it looks when unfolded–perfect circle!

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For beginners like me, this is where the tedious work begins. Pin the waistband to the top of the skirt (waist/inner circle) with right sides facing each other, then sew with a 0.5 in seam allowance as shown below. Do not forget to hem the top part of the waistband also. You may insert an elastic before doing so.

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Finally, finish your skirt by hemming the bottom of your skirt. I used a very stretchy material for this project so I didn’t have to use a zipper. If you want to know how to sew a zipper, go here for a more detailed tutorial.

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This is the final product! Looks great for a beginner, no?

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Will wear this skirt for my OOTD post so watch out for it! I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. Comment away if you have any questions! 😀

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In celebration of my upcoming birthday, I’m giving away amazing goodies for my local readers. Check it out here.

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