Divine Lee

Freeway X Manansala Special Tribute and Collection Launch

When I was kid, I dreamt of becoming an artist and fill a whole gallery of my paintings.

I still want to pursue that dream. In fact, what I’m currently interested in is very much related to the arts. Only this time, instead on a canvas, the masterpiece is “painted” on clothes, “painted” being a metaphorical word.

However, not until yesterday, I have never considered using real artworks as clothes. I mean I know it’s possible, but quite honestly it never crossed my mind.

But Freeway thought about it. For years, Freeway has been celebrating the Filipino’s creative talent by featuring the Philippine’s national artists, such as Nick Joaquin (Literature), Ang Kiukok (Visual Arts), Jose Garcia Villa (Literature), Ramon Valera (Fashion Design) and F. Sionil Jose, in their designs and collection. A few weeks ago, I received an e-mail from Freeway, inviting me to attend their collection launch and tribute to Vicente Manansala, a neo-realist artist who was recognized as national artist for visual arts in 1982.

“Manansala consistently worked in the figurative mode, with the exception of a few abstract works. Shunning Amorsolo’s rural idylls, he developed a new imagery based on the postwar urban experience. The city of Manila, through the vision of the artist, assumed a strong folk character. He painted an innovative mother and child, Madonna of the Slums, 1950, which reflected the poverty in postwar Manila. Besides the mother-and child, his subjects included jeepneys, barong-barong, cockfighters, families gathering for a modest meal, and Quiapo women vendors of various goods. The cubist aspect of Manansala’s work rests largely on the geometric facetting of forms and in the shifting and overlapping of planes. But his facets and planes are broader than in original cubism as they bring out larger rhythms. Here and there, he incorporates linear decorative patterns, as in the ironwork curlicues of gates and windows. In his work, he developed the style of transparent cubism which was generally shared by his fellow neo-realists Cesar Legaspi and Romeo Tabuena. Unlike analytical cubism, which arbitrarily fragments and dissects the figure into complex abstract compositions with only clues of the subject remaining, Manansala stayed close to the figure which he simplified to its basic geometric shape. He went through the black-and-white phase of crucifixions and madonna-and-child paintings, but, on the whole, he used color in all its folk vibrancy, sensuous appeal, and evocative power. As a whole, Manansala reinterpreted or indigenized cubism as he drew his themes from the familiar Filipino environment.”

The collection featured 22 designs, including graphic tees and dresses and as well as Manansala watches and bags, some of which I was able to take photos.

Tim Yap and Divine Lee as hosts of the event

A few shots from the collection

Special guests–Maritess Mendoza-Pineda, President of Friends of Manansala Foundation, Cedie Lopez-Vargas of the The Lopez Museum and Ronna Manansala, granddaughter of Vicente Manansala–interviewed by the hosts

And of course, the night will not be complete without an outfit shot 😀

Vest from Freeway | Printed dress worn as top from Freeway | Bandage skirt from Stylebreak | Heels from Parisian

Hype this look on lookbook and chictopia.

Animal print purse from Mango | Connector ring from Stylebreak | Winged heart from Zeros and Fives | Vintage bracelet from Landmark | Animal print belt from Landmark

Me with Chawen and Katt

Freebies! Who does not want them? 😀

The Vicente Manansala Collection will hit the stores on October 21! 🙂

So Ely, what’s on your head now?

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