Equinox

No, I don’t play the guitar or any instrument for that matter. Heck, I don’t even know how to use a triangle. But before you bash me for being a pretentious beyotch, let me tell you why I look this way. I warn you though, slight negativity awaits you.

Chad and I usually use our days off to shoot for his portfolio (and  my blog hehe). This week’s theme is music, hence the guitar, headphones, and speakers. My current look (meaning the hair) reminded us so much of 90s grunge, so we decided to use it as inspiration. I won’t tell you why I’m wearing a Union Jack shirt (yes, it’s a shirt) though because that’s errm confidential, at least for now.

However, just like every time we go shooting, it always rains. I don’t normally mind the rain as it sometimes gives a nice touch to photos, but every f****** time? Seriously? It’s gotten to a point where Chad and I would feel so annoyed and depressed because we didn’t get the shots we needed for our ‘project’.

We’ve thought of giving up already.  It’s really disappointing. But we realized, it will be much more disappointing if we will let an opportunity pass just because of some weather and financial constraints. Money can be earned but opportunities can’t. I mean, they are rare and once they’re gone, we can never get them back.

So here’s to hoping next week will be a better day for us.

We shot these with a Canon EOS Rebel G film camera using a Solid Gold ISO 200 color film. Also, this photo reminds me of Skrillex’s Equinox video. IDK. What do you think?

Mowgli

Hi, everyone! Here are the rest of the photos from the ‘Feral Child’ shoot Chad and I did last week. They were taken with a Canon AE-1 film camera using a Solid Gold ISO200 color film.

One of the most popular feral children in literature is Mowgli, a fictional character  in Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book. Rudyard Kipling is an English writer, mainly recognized for his soldiers’ and children’s stories. We hope you’ll like the photos! 🙂

More photos under the cut.

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Developing Photographs

By now I think you’ve already guessed that my boyfriend is a complete photography junkie. Chad is adept in using both film and digital cameras, but he enjoys using the former more especially when he gets to develop his own photographs. And it so happens that I’ve been wanting to do that for a really long time.

I’ve been curious about darkrooms since I saw Alicia Silverstone’s 1993 debut movie The Crush. If you’ve seen it, you can recall that Adrienne (Alicia Silverstone) had this BIIIG crush on Nick (Cary Elwes), who happened to have a photographer girlfriend named Amy. Being a complete psycho, Adrienne tried to kill Amy by locking wasps in her darkroom. Okay, I just realized that’s quite disturbing. Haha. *crickets*

Anyhoo… Last week, Chad taught me how to develop photographs and I will be sharing the stuff I learned.

Since we could not find an extra space for the equipment, we used my kitchen as a makeshift darkroom. We had to cover the windows with towels so light can’t come in and avoid exposing the film and photo paper.

Above are trays where the magic happens. The developer is the chemical that makes the image from the film visible.  The next tray contains the fixer, a chemical which stabilizes the image and makes it insensitive to light, hence the term ‘fix’. And last is the stop bath, which ends the development process and permanently preserves the photograph.

Of course, you cannot begin without your filmstrips…

negative holder…

and enlarger. The enlarger projects the image from the film to the photo paper. The photo paper is highly sensitive to light, except red light, so make sure to keep it in its folder when you’re not using it. Last week I had to cut paper in my pitch-black bathroom. I am not kidding. But I was able to do it! 😀

We wasted three photo papers before successfully printing a photo. It usually takes a few seconds to a few minutes to expose a photograph under the enlarger but our equipment’s light was a bit dim, so we had to expose the photo paper for 10 to 12 minutes.

Afterwards, we soaked the paper in the developer (1 minute); transferred it into the fixer (30 seconds); and dipped it in the stop bath (10 seconds).

Chad holding out our first product. This one was exposed for only 10 minutes, which probably explains why the background is not clear (?).

We decided to leave the next paper under the enlarger for 12 minutes, and we were so happy with the results. Here we are looking so proud. 🙂

The third one was okay but it had fingerprints on it so we decided to throw it away. Sad.

But hey, at least I got to use one as cover design for my fashionary sketchbook. 🙂

Come back soon for more wonderful photos! Finally got to print some from my Bell & Howell film camera and I’m really excited to show you. 🙂

Vintage

I like looking at old photographs, especially my parents’. They remind me so much of how innocent and unperturbed the times were back then. Sometimes I feel like many of us today are constantly chasing the wrong things. In the past, people’s ways of living are just simple and uncomplicated, unlike now.

These photos were taken using a Canon ae-1 film camera. My boyfriend is so much more comfortable using film cameras than the digital ones. These photos can already tell you why. I tried shooting some things using his camera too (which I will share really soon), and I immediately understood why he loves using it to take pictures.

More photos under the cut!

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